Everything you need to know for the general election | Five for the Weekend

Happy weekend, all.

The November general election is just days away. Do you have questions about the candidates, the races, or how to return your mail-in ballot?

We’ve got you covered.

Our “Election 2022” landing page contains election-related deadlines and coverage to help you prepare for election day, including:

Voters Guide 2022: What to know about Pa.’s races for governor and U.S. Senate

What to do to make sure your mail-in, absentee ballot counts on Election Day

Our voters’ guides and other election-related stories are also available in Spanish.

Curious about what legislative races we’re watching? We’ve got that too!

What legislative races the Capital-Star is watching on Nov. 8

As always, the top five stories from this week are below. 

House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, speaks at a February 2021 press conference.

1. U.S. Supreme Court rejects House GOP boss’ claim that Pa. legislative districts are racially gerrymandered

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge to Pennsylvania’s 2021 legislative redistricting map that said its makers engaged in racial gerrymandering.

Filed on behalf of House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, the petition for appeal argued the Legislative Redistricting Commission used race as the predominant factor in creating 14 districts where it positioned voters to create majority-minority districts.

It asked the court to decide whether the districts drawn for “transparently racial reasons,” beyond what is required by the Voting Rights Act, are constitutional merely because the commission also satisfied traditional redistricting principles.

Democratic U.S. Senate nominee John Fetterman (L) and Democratic gubernatorial nominee Josh Shapiro (R)
Campaign file photos

2. Pa’s 2022 candidates — and their stances on LGBTQ issues — take the national stage | Analysis

With mere weeks till Election Day, more than ten percent of Pennsylvania voters remain undecided in two of the most critical races in the country: John Fetterman and Mehmet Oz for the U.S. Senate, and Josh Shapiro and Doug Mastriano for governor.

Whoever wins Pennsylvania’s Senate race could determine which party holds a majority in Washington. Whoever is elected governor will not just impact the state — including LGBTQ policy — but will have influence over the 2024 presidential election as well.

Democratic U.S. Senate nominee John Fetterman (L) and Republican U.S. Senate nominee Mehmet Oz (R) Campaign file photos Democratic U.S. Senate nominee John Fetterman (L) and Republican U.S. Senate nominee Mehmet Oz (R)
Campaign file photos

3. Oz clarifies abortion views, Fetterman capitalizes on conflicting views in Senate race

Pennsylvania’s position as an abortion battleground state is taking shape in the U.S. Senate race, with John Fetterman, the Democratic nominee, capitalizing on conflicting statements from Mehmet Oz, his Republican opponent, in the high-profile contest.

Fetterman, who said he would support codifying Roe v. Wade if elected, has recently focused on Oz, who clarified his stance on abortion this month, and his views on reproductive health.

Oz told reporters at a press conference in Philadelphia this month that he would not support criminal penalties for people who sought or doctors who performed abortions. Describing himself as “strongly pro-life,” he added that he supports exceptions for rape, incest, or if the mother’s life is at risk.

A Lehigh County ballot box is seen at the Whitehall Township Municipal building before the May 17 primary (Photo by Donna Fisher/Armchair Lehigh Valley). A Lehigh County ballot box is seen at the Whitehall Township Municipal building before the May 17 primary (Photo by Donna Fisher/Armchair Lehigh Valley).

4. More than 9 million voters already have cast their ballots in November elections

Roughly 9.4 million Americans have already voted in the midterm elections, casting a combination of in-person early votes and mail-in ballots, according to data compiled by the United States Elections Project.

Florida as well as Georgia, Michigan and Pennsylvania are among the top states in terms of early voting so far.

The initiative, headed up by University of Florida Professor Michael McDonald, shows that, within states releasing the data, 2.6 million people have voted in person while 6.8 million have returned mail-in ballots. Another 41.6 million voters have requested mail-in ballots, according to the website.

Lt; Gov. John Fetterman in his Capitol office (Capital-Star photo by John L. Micek)

5. No, John Fetterman isn’t wearing a tie. And you need to stop talking about that | John L. Micek

So, this isn’t a “John Fetterman” column. And you know what we’re talking about here.

After more than two years on the statewide political stage, there’s already a well-established journalistic shorthand for Pennsylvania’s new lieutenant governor.

It’s the lather, rinse, repeat formula of “black clothes, bald head, tattoos, gosh he’s tall but skinnier, cheerleader for the struggling steel town of Braddock, Pa.” that’s launched a thousand profiles — including a recent one by NYMag.com.

And while all that’s true about Fetterman, it often feels like the media branding of Gov. Tom Wolf’s second-in-command overshadows the actual human behind it.

And that’s the week. We’ll see you back here next week.



Originally published at www.penncapital-star.com,by Cassie Miller

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